QuietCool Whole House Fan Buying Guide- Updated 2022

Ben Giesbrecht

QuietCool whole house fans are a key part of the picture if you are interested in a holistic approach to energy savings. However, if you’ve done any research on the fans, you probably felt a bit overwhelmed by the sheer number of whole house fan models they have.

QuietCool sells 4 different lines of whole house fans: Classic, Energy Saver, Trident Pro, and Stealth Pro. Each line has 7 sizes. Add that all up you have 28 whole house fans to choose from.

Let’s simplify your research.

Since saving energy while staying comfortable is what we do at Cosmic Comfort, so we put together this Quietcool guide! Now you can get one of the best bang for your buck home energy upgrades without second guessing yourself.

In this guide we will cover:

  • How to pick the right size QuietCool fan
  • Useful info for comparing fans
  • QuietCool Energy Saver vs Classic comparison
  • QuietCool Stealth Pro vs Trident Pro comparison
  • All fan models compared by size
  • Control Options
  • Attic Fans
  • Specialty Fans

What size QuietCool whole house fan do I need?

No matter which line you’re looking at, QuietCool fans are named and rated around their airflow. A fan that moves around 4,800 cubic feet of air per minute (CFM) will have a name like Trident 4.8 or Energy Saver 4700. Focus on the number to compare fans of the same size.

QuietCool recommends installing a whole house fan with 2-3 cfm per square foot of home living area and lists the square inches of attic venting required per fan. In our experience most people will be happiest with 3 cfm of air flow or the largest fan that their attic venting will support.

The reason we recommend sticking to the higher cfm fans is a larger fan running on low is more efficient than a small fan running on high and will be quieter for the same amount of airflow. For pure energy savings smaller fans work great but most people want the option to turn the fan on and feel strong air movement immediately.

Later in this guide we will break down each size of fan and which size home it works best in.

Useful information for comparing QuietCool fans.

Before we get into the fan by fan comparisons, let's define a few terms:

  • PSC or Permanent Split Capacitor Motors
    The motor type used in Trident and Classic fans, this is one of the original types of electric motors with its origins dating back to 1824. PSC motors are well known, low-cost type of motor that uses a capacitor to start and have limited options for speed controls. This is not a very efficient motor type and gets little if any efficiency benefits from running at a slower speed.
  • ECM or Electronically Commutated Motor
    Instead of using a capacitor and brushes that wear out, an ECM motor is a brushless electric motor that is computer-controlled with a small circuit board for improved efficiency. Because of this more efficient way of regulating power, ECM motors see a significant energy use advantage when run at low speeds.
  • Airflow
    Measured in Cubic Feet per Minute (CFM). QuietCool fans are rated using two different methods of measuring CFM.

    The one they advertise is a “Free Air Rating” where the fan is tested without the duct and damper box attached. We will use this rating in these comparisons even though it is not a real-world scenario simply because these figures are more widely known.

    The second testing method uses the California-approved HVI 916 testing standard with the fan fully assembled. I will include those numbers as well for interest's sake.
  • Watts
    When comparing the power QuietCool fans use, here are some points to anchor from. A typical air conditioner uses between 5,000 and 6,000 watts per hour. Bath fans range from 20-40 watts. Old school 60-watt bulbs have been replaced with 13-watt LEDs.

    PG&E charges around $.25 per 1,000 watts as a base rate so we will use that figure for easy math.
  • Decibels (dBA)
    Here are some sounds levels to compare to:
    30 dBA- Whispering/Rustling leaves
    50 dBA- Refrigerator at 3 feet
    60 dBA- Dishwasher

QuietCool Energy Saver vs Classic Whole House Fans

QuietCool Classic whole house fans use a 2 speed PSC motor while QuietCool Energy Saver fans use a quieter, more energy-efficient 2 speed ECM motor. Controls are not included in the box but both lines offer a 10-year warranty.

In the fan by fan comparison section below we have full specs listed for each size of fan to help you determine which model is best for you.

QuietCool Stealth Pro vs Trident Pro Whole House Fans

QuietCool Stealth Pro fans use an energy-efficient ECM motor with 3 speeds for most models compared to the Trident Pro’s 2 speed PSC motor. The Stealth fans are slightly quieter than the same size Trident fan and have an ultra-efficient low speed for overnight use.

Both Stealth and Trident fans are from QuietCool’s flagship professional line and are only available through authorized dealers. The professional line of fans are further distinguished from the retail lines by including wall controls and extending the warranty to 15 years.

Which QuietCool line is best for you? 

In our opinion, its worth it to opt for a fan from a professional line for the included controls and extra warranty. The fan only purchase price from a QuietCool dealer like Cosmic Comfort will be very competitive with a retail model purchased at a big box store.

The only downside is local pickup at a dealer compared to shipping to your home from a store.

If you intend to pay someone to install the fan for you, buying from a dealer will almost certainly be more cost-effective than purchasing a fan by itself and finding a competent contractor to install it for you.

Beyond dealer vs retail purchase, what you are really comparing in QuietCool fan lines are PSC and ECM motors.

In our experience a Trident / Classic fan with a PSC motor make sense in 3 scenarios:

  • You have a small home (under 1,200 sq. ft.) that only needs a 3.3 to cool.
  • The fan will only run for short periods of time, mostly on high.
  • It is a secondary small fan used to cool a specific room like a  master bedroom suite with the door closed to the rest of the house.

In all other cases we feel the Stealth / Energy Saver lines are the best choice because:

  • They are more efficient, especially on low.
  • On average they are 2-3 decibels quieter.
  • Stealth fans with 3 speeds give more options for you to find the perfect balance of  airflow, noise, and energy use.

QuietCool Whole House Fans compared by size.

QuietCool Stealth 1.5 vs Trident 1.5 vs Classic 1500 vs Energy Saver 1500.

Recommended for small rooms in the 500 to 700 square foot range, the 1.5 size of fans only have a single speed.

In our experience this is a fan with limited utility. You are almost always better off moving up to a 2.5 class of fan for an extra speed and enough air flow for an instant cooling effect.

Here are how the fans compare to each other:

Specs Stealth Trident Energy Saver Classic
CFM 1,479 1,498 1,434 1,472
HVI CFM 1,040 1,110 1,010 1,100
Watts 66.7 115 64.5 117
dBA 37.2 37.4 37.2 37.4
Venting 1.98 Sq Ft 2 Sq Ft 1.92 Sq Ft 1.97 Sq Ft
Grill Size 16x16 16x16 16x16 16x16

Take our quiz to receive an instant installed fan quote sized to your home.

If you are interested in installing one of these fans yourself, contact us to purchase a fan from the Stealth or Trident line or click here to see the latest price on an Energy Saver 1500.

QuietCool Stealth 2.5 vs Trident 2.5 vs Classic 2250 vs Energy Saver 2250.

The 2.5 class of whole house fans are great for a master bedroom suite where you'd love to feel some airflow at night but want to keep your bedroom door closed for privacy. These fans also work well in smaller homes with 800 to 1,200 square footage.

You can start to see how the ECM motor saves energy on lower speeds here:

Specs: Stealth Trident Energy Saver Classic
CFM Hi: 2,541 / Low: 2,018 Hi: 2,490 / Low: 1,934 Hi: 2,492 / Low: 1,991 Hi: 2,465 / Low: 1,910
HVI CFM Hi: 1,920 / Low: 1,510 Hi: 1,800 / Low: 1,370 Hi: 1,850 / Low: 1,420 Hi: 1,770 / Low: 1,330
Watts Hi: 157 / Low: 82.3 Hi: 244 / Low: 198 Hi: 150 / Low: 79.5 Hi: 250 / Low: 201
dBA Hi: 42.7 / Low: 37.2 Hi: 43.2 / Low: 37.4 Hi: 42.7 / Low: 37.2 Hi: 43.2 / Low: 37.4
Venting 3.39 Sq Ft 3.32 Sq Ft 3.33 Sq Ft 3.29 Sq Ft
Grill Size 16x20 16x20 16x20 16x20

Take our quiz to receive an instant installed fan quote sized to your home.

If you are interested in installing one of these fans yourself, contact us to purchase a fan from a professional line or check the latest price on an Energy Saver 2250 or a Classic 2250.

QuietCool Stealth 3.3 vs Trident 3.3 vs Classic 3100 vs Energy Saver 3100.

A QuietCool 3.3 is usually the smallest whole house fan we recommend as the main fan for a home. It has adequate airflow for 1,000 to 1,500 square feet. The Stealth 3.3 appears to be the clear winner here based on airflow and wattage. It compares favorably to most 2.5 fans on low as well with lower noise levels and wattage for that overnight cooling effect.

Specs: Stealth Trident Energy Saver Classic
CFM Hi: 3,159 / Low: 1,980 Hi: 3,216 / Low: 2,890 Hi: 3,081 / Low: 2,020 Hi: 3,126 / Low: 2,847
HVI CFM Hi: 2,350 / Low: 1,470 Hi: 2,450 / Low: 2,230 Hi: 2,400 / Low: 1,500 Hi: 2,380 / Low: 2,160
Watts Hi: 264 / Low: 74.6 Hi: 323 / Low: 274 Hi: 285 / Low: 80.8 Hi: 299 / Low: 256
dBA Hi: 47.4 / Low: 36.1 Hi: 49.4 / Low: 46.8 Hi: 47.4 / Low: 36.1 Hi: 49.4 / Low: 46.8
Venting 4.22 Sq Ft 4.29 Sq Ft 4.11 Sq Ft 4.17 Sq Ft
Grill Size 16x24 16x24 16x24 16x24

Take our quiz to receive an instant installed fan quote sized to your home.

If you are interested in installing one of these fans yourself, contact us to purchase a fan from a professional line or check the latest price on an Energy Saver 3100 or a Classic 3100.

QuietCool Stealth 4.8 vs Trident 4.8 vs Classic 4700 vs Energy Saver 4700.

The Stealth 4.8 is arguably the best whole house fan QuietCool makes. It hits the sweet spot of airflow and wattage at a very low noise level. The 4.8 class of fans is best for homes in the 1,400 to 2,000 square foot range.

From here on the advantages the Stealth line brings start separating them from the pack.

Specs: Stealth Trident Energy Saver Classic
CFM Hi: 4,280 / Med: 3,500 / Low: 2,361 Hi: 4,428 / Low: 3,436 Hi: 4,195 / Low: 2,304 Hi: 4,415 / Low: 3,402
HVI CFM Hi: 3,130 / Med: 2,560 / Low: 1,670 Hi: 3,260 / Low: 2,570 Hi: 3,080 / Low: 1,620 Hi: 3,230 / Low: 2,560
Watts Hi: 408 / Med: 225 / Low: 73.9 Hi: 555 / Low: 417 Hi: 415 / Low: 75 Hi: 551 / Low: 415
dBA Hi: 47.4 / Med: 41.6 / Low: 33 Hi: 49.4 / Low: 43.2 Hi: 47.4 / Low: 33 Hi: 49.4 / Low: 43.2
Venting 5.71 Sq Ft 5.91 Sq Ft 5.6 Sq Ft 5.89 Sq Ft
Grill Size 16x32 16x32 16x32 16x32

Take our quiz to receive an instant installed fan quote sized to your home.

If you are interested in installing one of these fans yourself, contact us to purchase a fan from a professional line or check the latest price on an Energy Saver 4700 or a Classic 4700.

QuietCool Stealth 5.5 vs Trident 5.5 vs Classic 5400 vs Energy Saver 5400.

The 5.5 class of whole house fans is best for homes from 1,600 to 2,400 square feet. It has the same footprint as the 4.8 fans but with a more powerful motor. Due to this the decibels are a little higher but with increased airflow to match.

Specs: Stealth Trident Energy Saver Classic
CFM Hi: 5,044 / Med: 4,238 / Low: 2,870 Hi: 5,068 / Low: 4,438 Hi: 5,003 / Low: 2,842 Hi: 5,024 / Low: 4,406
HVI CFM Hi: 3,750 / Med: 3,070 / Low: 2,010 Hi: 3,940 / Low: 3,220 Hi: 3,810 / Low: 2,020 Hi: 3,950 / Low: 3,240
Watts Hi: 490 / Med: 268 / Low: 88.0 Hi: 632 / Low: 522 Hi: 497 / Low: 88.9 Hi: 634 / Low: 525
dBA Hi: 50.7 / Med: 43.6 / Low: 35.6 Hi: 51.2 / Low: 45.7 Hi: 50.7 / Low: 35.6 Hi: 51.2 / Low: 45.7
Venting 6.73 Sq Ft 6.76 Sq Ft 6.68 Sq Ft 6.7 Sq Ft
Grill Size 16x32 16x32 16x32 16x32

Take our quiz to receive an instant installed fan quote sized to your home.

If you are interested in installing one of these fans yourself, contact us to purchase a fan from a professional line or check the latest price on an Energy Saver 5400 or a Classic 5400.

QuietCool Stealth 6.0 vs Trident 6.0 vs Classic 6000 vs Energy Saver 6000.

Just like the 4.8 fans, the 6.0 class of whole house fans seems to have hit a sweet spot. For homes from 1,800 to 2,700 square feet there's no better choice.

Compared to going up or down a size, a Stealth 6.0 has a terrific combination of airflow, energy use, and noise levels, surpassing the 5.5 in each category!

Check out how the different lines compare here:

Specs: Stealth Trident Energy Saver Classic
CFM Hi: 5,587 / Med: 4,262 / Low: 3,428 Hi: 5,708 / Low: 4,319 Hi: 5,576 / Low: 3,417 Hi: 5,665 / Low: 4,289
HVI CFM Hi: 4,030 / Med: 3,070 / Low: 2,440 Hi: 4,150 / Low: 3,190 Hi: 4,040 / Low: 2,450 Hi: 4,160 / Low: 3,200
Watts Hi: 462 / Med: 210 / Low: 113 Hi: 777 / Low: 560 Hi: 455 / Low: 112 Hi: 769 / Low: 560
dBA Hi: 49.3 / Med: 42.5 / Low: 38.5 Hi: 51.1 / Low: 44.1 Hi: 49.3 / Low: 38.5 Hi: 51.1 / Low: 44.1
Venting 7.45 Sq Ft 7.62 Sq Ft 7.44 Sq Ft 7.56 Sq Ft
Grill Size 16x38 16x38 16x38 16x38

Take our quiz to receive an instant installed fan quote sized to your home.

If you are interested in installing one of these fans yourself, contact us to purchase a fan from a professional line or check the latest price on an Energy Saver 6000 or a Classic 6000.

QuietCool Stealth 7.0 vs Trident 7.0 vs Classic 7000 vs Energy Saver 7000.

If you need to move a lot of air, a 7.0 is what you want. Best for homes from 2,300 to 3,500 square feet, the 7.0 class are the largest fans QuietCool makes. With this increase in airflow comes an increase in wattage and attic venting requirements.

If you are looking at a Trident or Classic model you may need a dedicated electrical circuit for it as these fans pull over 10 amps on high. Another thing to consider is attic venting in large 2 story homes. With attic space only half the size of the square footage lack of venting often comes into play.

Check out the specs here:

Specs: Stealth Trident Energy Saver Classic
CFM Hi: 6,996 / Med: 5,448 / Low: 4,308 Hi: 7,015 / Low: 5,548 Hi: 6,878 / Low: 4,304 Hi: 6,924 / Low: 5,518
HVI CFM Hi: 5,200 / Med: 3,990 / Low: 3,180 Hi: 5,300 / Low: 4,150 Hi: 5,170 / Low: 3,150 Hi: 5,300 / Low: 4,100
Watts Hi: 725 / Med: 319 / Low: 166 Hi: 1,147 / Low: 797 Hi: 727 / Low: 164 Hi: 1,147 / Low: 794
dBA Hi: 51.7 / Med: 45.3 / Low: 41.4 Hi: 54.3 / Low: 47.4 Hi: 51.7 / Low: 41.4 Hi: 54.3 / Low: 47.4
Venting 9.33 Sq Ft 9.36 Sq Ft 9.18 Sq Ft 9.24 Sq Ft
Grill Size 16x38 16x38 16x38 16x38

Take our quiz to receive an instant installed fan quote sized to your home.

If you are interested in installing one of these fans yourself, contact us to purchase a fan from a professional line or check the latest price on an Energy Saver 7000 or a Classic 7000.

What do I Need to Know About  Controls?

There are 3 control options for QuietCool Whole house fans, each with pros and cons. The options are: a remote, hardwired switches with a timer, or hardwired switches with a smart switch.

Remote

Pros:

  • It's handy.
  • Can be wall mounted or mobile.
  • Has a built in timer.

Cons:

  • It can be a little finicky to operate.
  • There are batteries to replace.
  • In general remotes are not as reliable as hardwired switches.

Hardwired switches (standard on Cosmic Comfort installs)

Pros:

  • Rock solid reliability.
  • Can't be misplaced.

Cons:

  • Limited install locations.
  • Operates only from one location.

Hardwired switches with a smart switch combines the two  options.

Pros:

  • You can turn the fan on from your phone or connect it to Amazon Alexa / Google Home.
  • Backup controls if the wireless doesn't work.
  • Reliability more similar to hardwired switches than a remote.

Cons:

  • Extra cost to install ($199 option).
  • Less user friendly to set up. Recommended for someone with some interest in tech.
  • Higher chance to turn the fan on when no one is home or without open windows.

Attic Fans - Redundant or Worth it? 

There's a lot of confusion about attic fans. In fact we have a whole blog post about the difference between attic fans and whole house fans. But here's the short version:

Attic fans run during the hottest part of the day while whole house fans run at the coolest time so no, the fans aren't redundant. With their relatively low cost and energy use Attic Gable Fans (if you have a gable vent) are a good buy.

If you don't have a gable vent but do have a standard shingle roof an Attic Roof Mount Fan is a good choice.

Solar attic fans cost more and move much less air so I don't feel they are a good buy for most people. 

A QuietCool Smart Attic Gable fan can be added to any installation for $499 while the Roof Mount Fan is $799 as an add on.

This is a Gable Vent

Cost and Return on Investment

Fans are great and all but what’s the bottom line? What will it cost and when does it pay off?

The great news is that when used as recommended, a QuietCool whole house fan with installation typically pays for itself in energy savings in 2-4 years. If you are the DIY type and donate your labor, it’s more like a 1 year pay off! Even casual investors know that a 40+% annual return on investment is amazing.

Getting Your Fan

To find out which fan is best for your home, we have built a short quiz that gathers your home's info and sends you quotes on the fan choices appropriate for your home. Click the button below to try it out!

Ceiling fans are definitely aesthetically pleasing. But did you know they can also help save you money on your Frederick, MD home’s heating and air conditioning bills? What’s more, they also help your home maintain superior indoor air quality. Wenbrooke Services provides quality ceiling fan installation for homeowners throughout the greater Frederick, MD area. Whether you’re looking to install a ceiling fan in one room or throughout the entire house, we can help you select the right type of fan for each area of your home while ensuring safe ceiling fan installation and proper performance for years to come!

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How do ceiling fans work?

Designed to be used in hot and cold weather alike, ceiling fans work by either pushing warm air down or pulling warm air upward. A control mechanism allows you to change the direction of the fan’s rotation to provide you with pleasing personal comfort.

  • This is a test line
  • Why do the chicken cross the road.
  • let me see what I can do
  • Cosmic Comfort supplied bath fan

To keep your home’s ceiling fans in peak condition, make sure to properly maintain them. Keep the fan blades clean from dirt, dust, and mites. Every week or two, simply use a soft cloth and some dusting spray to remove any buildup. Occasionally check to make sure all bolts and screws are tight, since the ceiling fan’s vibration can loosen them over time. Finally, be sure to lubricate the ceiling fan’s moving parts once a year so the fan continues to work like new.

Keep the fan blades clean from dirt, dust, and mites. Every week or two, simply use a soft cloth and some dusting spray to remove any buildup.

Air conditioning systems are designed to last 15-20 years. Typical warranties last 10 years, but with proper maintenance and some luck your system could last 30+ years. On the flip side, a poorly installed system with no maintenance done might be toast after just 5 years.

Ceiling fans are definitely aesthetically pleasing. But did you know they can also help save you money on your Frederick, MD home’s heating and air conditioning bills? What’s more, they also help your home maintain superior indoor air quality. Wenbrooke Services provides quality ceiling fan installation for homeowners throughout the greater Frederick, MD area. Whether you’re looking to install a ceiling fan in one room or throughout the entire house, we can help you select the right type of fan for each area of your home while ensuring safe ceiling fan installation and proper performance for years to come!

Ceiling Fan Services

Whether you’re looking for increased energy savings, additional lighting, or a stylish addition to any room, ceiling fans are a great solution. They come in a variety of sizes, colors, and materials and are designed to complement any architectural or interior decorating style.

When you need ceiling fan installation, repair, or replacement services for your Frederick, MD home, Wenbrooke Services is the one to call.

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